Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘weather’ Category

First off, the sun is shining as the morning fog gives up its fuzzy grip on Juneau. The forecast on the weather page of this morning’s Juneau Empire shows continuing sunny days for the foreseeable future. As my son says, the best forecast here is for a continuation of whatever today’s weather is.  Which ain’t so nice when it’s raining, but I’ll take it right now.

In line with my mission (?) to try to keep up with technology, at least as it pertains to daily living, I’ve been studying Social Media Marketing. Among other happenings, from a not-very-active Facebook user, I now routinely go there as part of my daily internet check (email (5 of them gdang it), news feeds, etc.)  Underneath the FB (‘scuse me, FaceBook) veil of trivia there is healthy connection to those far away (or even in the next room) – clearly the reason for the site’s phenomenal growth.  My favorite way to learn new technical stuff, though, is at Lynda.com which has a great course on Social Media Marketing and another on Twitter – Essential Training.  Hand in hand with that study, though, I need ways to apply what I’m learning.  Not hard to find, for organizations I work with.  So I’ve added some more projects to my never-ending todo list.  And, forgive me friends, but I set up TwitterFeed to automatically feed blog posts to the TrouserRollers FaceBook and Twitter pages.

Happily, my morning piano practice time has moved into the sacred zone, so this particular interest (?compulsion) seems not to be in danger of bumping into it.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Quite a storm at the moment, here’s our current weather forecast:

SOUTHERN LYNN CANAL-
400 AM AKST SAT NOV 14 2009
...GALE WARNING THROUGH TONIGHT...
.TODAY...S WIND 35 KT INCREASING TO 45 KT IN THE AFTERNOON. SEAS
9 FT. RAIN IN THE MORNING...THEN RAIN AND SNOW SHOWERS IN THE
AFTERNOON.
.TONIGHT...S WIND 35 KT DIMINISHING TO 25 KT LATE. SEAS 7 FT
SUBSIDING TO 5 FT LATE. RAIN AND SNOW SHOWERS.
.SUN...S WIND 20 KT. SEAS 4 FT. SNOW SHOWERS.
.SUN NIGHT...N WIND 20 KT. SEAS 4 FT. SNOW SHOWERS.
.MON...N GALE TO 35 KT. SEAS 6 FT. RAIN AND SNOW SHOWERS.
.TUE...N GALE TO 35 KT. SEAS 7 FT.
.WED...N WIND 25 KT. SEAS 5 FT.

Power went out around 7:30am, so decided to go tour the area. The entire town is in the dark. A power boat had broken loose in Aurora harbour and driven by the gale had pinned an also loose sailboat to the breakwater. Found a small leak at one window frame, and the cover to the stack from the boiler blew off – retrieved for safekeeping until things are calmer. Mother nature at her most powerful. Reminds me of my childhood in Oban, Scotland – same latitude, same storms.

Power came back on at 8:30am, good job AEL&P. Be interesting to find out what was the cause, and if the additional power from the new Lake Dorothy power station reduced the need to use backup diesel generators.

After watching 60 Minutes last Sunday on Sabotaging the System about the potential for hackers to get into computer systems that run crucial elements of the world’s infrastructure, such as the power grids, water works, etc., very thankful to be “off the grid” and reliant on hydro power which, given the amount of rainfall here, is a renewable resource.

No hot tub this morning – how fortunate I am to have this as my only complaint.  The World Food Program states that, for the first time, a billion people are hungry and without food security. It has launched a campaign – a billion for a billion – to help raise funds for the starving.

Even though I believe that feeding hungry people is simply keeping them alive until the next crisis, and that such crises are nature’s way of controlling the human population explosion, from a humanitarian perspective how can one not contribute without being callous? The human dilemma: we can control neither our exploding population nor its consequences. Pass the word…… [Note: I earmarked my donations to “provide meals to more school children, especially girls, thus allowing them to stay in school.” It’s my belief that the best way to control population is by educating girls – not to mention ameliorating the over-abundance of testosterone that has produced our present climate of global violence.]

Read Full Post »

Turning 70 last Thursday was a sobering experience.

  • A morning call from my brother in Australia brought us worries about his health along with news about Melbourne’s National Day of Mourning for those who died, and whose communities were obliterated, in Victoria’s recent fires.
  • Early evening we attended a talk entitled “What’s Happening to the Arctic? A Thinking Person’s Guide to the Future” by Neil Hamilton, director of the World Wildlife Fund’s International Arctic Program. “What’s happening in the Arctic is deeply profound,” he told us. “It’s going to affect all of our lives.” And, we only have 3-4 years to change course or it will be too late.

Today we read about words spoken (more…)

Read Full Post »

I’m back from Courtenay, BC, after a good visit with Marian. Happy to be able to support her as she faces multiple challenges.

And now, as frequently, the climate is stage center again.

  • I talked to my brother, Sandy, in Lara, south of Melbourne, Australia yesterday.  Victoria (the provincial state) is burning up. Extended drought, high winds, and unbearable heat (117°F) have turned some communities into gigantic bonfires. Meanwhile, the north of the country is in monsoon time – one area in Queensland reported almost a metre of rain in a 24-hour period.
  • An avalanche just south of Juneau yesterday closed the (only) road to the adjacent settlement of Thane, marooning some 30 households.  18′ of snow blocked 300′ of roadway. (more…)

Read Full Post »

A quick rundown before I leave for 10 days to visit my high school friend Marian in Courtenay, BC, on Vancouver Island. Only 750 miles as the crow flies. Tribute to the isolation of communities in Alaska and BC, I first go  950 miles south to Seattle, then 100+ miles north to Vancouver, then 80 miles northwest across the Georgia Strait to Comox and thence 12 more to Courtenay.  All of which wil eat up 15 hours of tomorrow’s 24. (more…)

Read Full Post »

A New Day

After a week of balmy weather, winter is back. Cold and sunny. And, in the single month since solstice we’ve gained 67 minutes of daylight. Remarkable to notice how obvious is the lengthening of each day.

We joined hundreds (thousands?) of others at Centennial Hall on Tuesday, carrying our contribution to a potluck breakfast sponsored by the Juneau World Affairs Council. Watched the event on a big screen among an eager crowd of all ages sitting on chairs, on the floor, standing, waving. Made a person feel proud, so much positive energy.  After 50+ hours, a new day is dawning with the watch of a new president. The helm of the ship of state begins to turn, moving the behemoth away from (what seems to me) a path of self-destruction.

Read Full Post »

After the snow cometh the rain.  Everything has turned to slush as the temperature has risen.  Near 40°F today. High avalanche warnings everywhere. And the power (electricity) went out soon after noon. Ominously, it went out all over the City from end to end.  Turns out an avalanche took out one of the transmission towers near the Snettisham hydroelectric plant 45 miles south. One of the same three towers that were taken out last March.  So, AEL&P has switched over to emergency diesel generation……   Time to turn down the lights – and be grateful for our low wattage bulbs. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »